Mortar joints are typically 3/8", but can vary from 1/4" to 1/2".  Joints are finished using a tool or the trowel.  Each type of joint has pros and cons, which are mostly related to their effectiveness at shedding water.

Concave Joint

Concave Joint

Good: The standard joint, which is universally accepted as the best joint for preventing water penetration.


V Joint

V Joint

Fair: This joint is less successful at shedding water due to the point of the V, which can be an entry point for water if not tooled perfectly.


Weathered Joint

Weathered Joint

Fair: Due to the slope of the mortar, this joint also performs fairly well.  However, water can run across the underside of the brick and enter if the mortar is not well adhered.

Ad - Article Continues Below
Struck Joint

Struck Joint

Very Poor: The slope of the joint pulls water into the joint and allows it to sit on the brick, which gives the water more time to penetrate.

Interior Use Only.


Flush Joint

Flush Joint

Poor: This joint is susceptible to water sitting on the top of the joint if it protrudes slightly from the brick.


Raked Joint

Raked Joint

Very Poor: The ledge allows water to sit on top of the brick and potentially get sucked into the wall.

Interior Use Only.

Ad - Article Continues Below

Masonry Mortar Manufacturers

Masonry Products
Masonry Mortar

Help make archtoolbox better. If you found an error or out of date information in this article, please let us know.

Archtoolbox Monthly Newsletter: Website updates, industry news, career growth, and more. Sign up now!